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What If The London Eye Rolled Away?

The London Eye.

To some it may seem like just a big glorious wheel, but to the rest of us, it is a souvenir

from the turn of the millennia and is now an imperative landmark upon the London Skyline.

But what if it was no longer there?

Hello and welcome back to Life’s Biggest Questions.

I am Rebecca Felgate and today I am asking What if the London Eye Rolled Away.

Sure….it is difficult to say that with a straight face, but luckily, you can’t see

my face…so let’s get rolling with this simulated reality video.

Of course before we set this video into motion, I want to remind you that we love it when

you leave a thumbs up and a comment on our work.

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OKAY London Eye, where you at?

The London Eye is comprised of 32 pods on a 443 ft wheel, firmly secured by spoke cables,

back cables and A Frame Legs.

It weighs over 1 million pounds or 1,000 tons, which is very heavy.

It would take some serious momentum to detach it from its fixtures and set it on a rolling

path… but to heck with the unlikelihood of it all, you guys came here to find out

what would happen if it rolled.

THEY SEE ME ROLLIN.

THEY HATIN.

To be fair, the rolling away of the London eye would be no laughing matter.

If it happened during peak hours, the eye would contain 800 people who would likely

be crushed as the roll smashed the capsules.

If they were lucky, the capsules could hold, but they would still be thrown around in a

roomy 10 ton and approx.

10 ft high capsule.

Not only would the 800 people in the capsule be at risk of death or injury, the location

of the eye on the southbank of London’s River Thames is a very very busy tourist area.

Thousands upon thousands of people could be at risk of death.

If the London Eye rolled away, along with breaking many things in its path, it would

also break its own speed records.

Usually, the London eye travels at 0.6 miles per hour, but to actually move on the ground

rather than its spokes, it would need to be travelling much faster.

Now, our question asks what if the London Eye Rolled Away, but to be honest, it really

couldn’t roll too far.

Even if it did gain enough momentum for numerous rotations, there are big bridges it would

crash into in both directions.

If it rolled up the Southbank, it would hit the Golden Jubilee Bridges in 0.1 mile, or

Westminster Bridge in 0.2 miles if it rolled the other way.

If it hit either bridge, it would likely be enough to send the wheel into a watery grave

in the Thames.

Or, the eye could catastrophically role through the Jubilee Gardens and into the pit of the

BFI Imax, crushing cars and all else in its path.

Either way, the London Eye couldn’t roll far, although it would be far enough to be

one of the biggest potential catastrophes the city has seen since the World War 2 Blitz.

Aside from that, coca cola, the current owners, would be pretty sad about the loss of their

money making machine, after all, the London eye is the busiest attraction in London.

As a result, other less rollable tourist spots would likely see a surge in tourism over time…although

I suppose that would depend on the circumstances surrounding the roll.

If it was as a result of an elaborate terrorist plot, people may be wary of other busy hot

spots… but once again, really, a plot to roll the London eye is as unlikely as it is

ridiculous.

If the London eye rolled away, it would be some pretty apocalyptic stuff…

So there is one fanciful answer for you…what do you think would happen if the London eye

rolled away?

What about if the shard fell over or Buckingham Palace took off and flew to the moon?

Let me know in the comments section below.

For now, I am your host Rebecca Felgate, if you liked this video, make sure you give it

a thumbs up and share it with a friend.

I’ll catch you in the next video, but for now, stay curious, stay alert and never ever

stop questioning.

If you want to hear more of life’s big answers, why not check our biggest what ifs playlist,

and our biggest science answers.