a

Deadly Blue-ringed Octopus

what's the only venomous animal on the

planet that doesn't make its own venom

here's a clue it is three hearts pumping

blue blood it digests its food through

its brain as a bird-like beak deadly

saliva weighs only 25 grams is

jet-powered is a night dweller can

change color uses its body as a Cape has

no bones a tongue like drill is a

contortionist oh it has eight arms

Sumeet the blue-ringed octopus it's a

little tiny octopus probably out as big

as my thumb with a fearsome reputation

it's found right throughout the tropics

and the temperate regions of the world

in places just like this and it's one of

the most venomous animals on the planet

as the name suggests these little

octopus have vivid blue rings that they

flash for couple of reasons one when

things are attacking them to say I'm

toxic leave me alone when they're

chasing their prey but what makes them

so toxic will be cool and that they

don't make their own then they use other

organisms bacteria they find out here

and they hide them in their saliva

glands

now these toxins that are produced the

things called TTX or tratado toxins are

secreted by the bacteria so when a blue

ring for example chases a crab it jumps

on it and it uses its bird-like beak to

chew a hole in the exoskeleton and then

spit saliva into it as its saliva goes

in the toxin goes with it and it attacks

the nerves and it basically stops the

nerve impulse from traveling down your

nerve so what that means is you become

paralyzed crabs for example that the

fitting on all us if we're bitten we go

through this paralysis as well seriously

cool toxin

only a handful of people have ever died

from the bite of this little octopus but

if you're unlucky enough to get bitten

what actually happens well your

voluntary muscle system shuts down you

can't breathe and you become paralyzed

you collapse on the ground now the cool

thing about this toxin is you can

actually produce real zombies with them

that's another story and that's the

nature of science